Suicide

The Suicide’s Argument

Ere the birth of my life, if I wished it or no
No question was asked me–it could not be so !
If the life was the question, a thing sent to try
And to live on be YES; what can NO be ? to die.

NATURE’S ANSWER

Is’t returned, as ’twas sent ? Is’t no worse for the wear ?
Think first, what you ARE ! Call to mind what you WERE !
I gave you innocence, I gave you hope,
Gave health, and genius, and an ample scope,
Return you me guilt, lethargy, despair ?
Make out the invent’ry ; inspect, compare !
Then die–if die you dare !

Samuel Taylor Coleridge 

I’ve almost never had suicidal thoughts or impulses; my depressions tends to turn violently toward the outside world.  But some of my closest friends have and when I read this poem today, I thought of them.   I don’t think suicide was ever very far from Coleridge’s mind.

The Smiling Mouth and Laughing Eyen Grey

The smiling mouth and laughing eyen grey,
The breastes round, and long small armes twain,
The handes smooth, and sides straight and plain,
Your feetes lite – what should I further say?
It is my craft when ye are far away
To muse thereon in stinting of my pain.

The smiling mouth and laughing eyen grey,
The breastes round, and long small armes twain.

So would I pray you, if I durst or may,
The sight to see as I have seen,
Forwhy that craft me is most fain
And will be to the hour in which I deye

The smiling mouth and laughing eyen grey,
The breastes round, and long small armes twain.

                                    – Charles d’Orleans

I couldn’t find this poem anywhere on the web so I typed it up as my contribution to world literature.

Small means slender.  Plain = smooth.

Charles was a French noble (nephew of the French king) who was captured at the battle of Agincourt and held captive in England for 25 years.  He is considered the father of the French lyric poetry and wrote great poems in English too, like this one.